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Minneapolis, MN Attorneys, Lawyers and Law Firms

Directory of Minneapolis, Minnesota Attorneys, Lawyers, Law Firms, etc.
(4726 attorneys currently listed)

Featured Minneapolis Attorneys

Criminal Attorneys »
MinnesotaLawyers.com
5775 Wayzata Blvd., Ste. 700
St. Louis Park, MN 55416
(612) 240-8005
Aggressive and Affordable representation!
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Employment Attorneys »
Law Office of
Joshua R. Williams, PLLC
1624 Harmon Place, Suite 300Q
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55403
(612) 486-5540
Minneapolis Employment Lawyer
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Enhanced Listings

100 South Fifth Street, Suite 1100
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55402
(612) 333-2111
Business and Corporate Lawyers
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Minneapolis, MN Attorney News

Woman faces five years in jail for lying to a grand jury

A five-year jail term looms over Saynab Hussein after she pleaded guilty to having lied before a grand jury in 2009 about young men leaving Minnesota for Somalia and joining a terrorist group.

Hussein admitted having told the grand jury that she had no idea or was not aware of anyone raising funds for the men being recruited to go to Somalia.

Hussein, now 23 and carrying a child, in fact, was one of those who had raised the funds.

Minnesota criminal defense attorney John Lundquist attributed his client's mistake to being young but that she has regretted what she has done.

Hussein is one of the long list of persons charged in connection with the government's investigation on the recruitment of young men for terrorism in Somalia.

Hussein's sentencing has yet to be scheduled.

United States Attorney News

Los Angeles lawyers insist on client's release

Blair Berk and Leonard Levine, defense lawyers in Los Angeles, are arguing for the release of their client, Darren Sharper, who used to play in the National Football League.

Sharper has submitted a not guilty plea to sexually assaulting two women in Los Angeles.

However, Sharper remains on indefinite custody with no bail after prosecutors pointed out that he also has an arrest warrant issued by authorities in Louisiana.

Sharper's lawyers are insisting on his release because no case has been filed yet pertaining to the Louisiana arrest warrant.

Man cleared of theft charges

Kevin Keheley can breathe a sigh of relief after a jury exonerated him of theft.

Keheley was accused of defrauding a man after entering into a contract of developing an application for a smartphone, which he was never able to produce.

The contract was for $17,000 and Keheley was paid up front with $10,000.

Keheley then relocated to Austin but promised to finish the application. This, however, never happened.

Denver criminal lawyer Laurie Schmidt, who defended for Keheley, said that what happened was a business dispute.

Schmidt added that Keheley had no intention of running away from giving back the money that he received as evidenced by emails showing his intention to pay the money back.

Woman charged in death of fiancé’s two-year-old daughter

Melinda Muniz has been arrested and charged with the death of Grace Ford, the two-year-old daughter of her fiance, who reportedly broke up with her.

Aside from being the fiancee of the victim's father, Muniz was also the caregiver of the little girl.

Muniz's arrest has generated widespread anger with hundreds expressing their disgust for the suspect online.

Robbie McClung, a Dallas criminal attorney who will be defending for Muniz, urged the public to wait for all the facts before judging Muniz.

The police have also stated that Muniz is not considered guilty until proven otherwise.

Former Human Rights Commission employee enters plea deal in child pornography

Larry Brinkin, who used to work for the Human Rights Commission of San Francisco, entered into a plea deal agreement on his child pornography charges.

The plea deal saw a second charge of child pornography distribution dropped against the 67-year-old Brinkin.

Under the plea deal, Brinkin will spend six months behind bars and another six months of house arrest. Afterwhich, he will undergo probation for four years.

Brinkin, who is a staunch supporter of the LGBT advocacy, will also be entered in the list of sexual offender and is ordered to go through therapy.

Randall Knox, an attorney in San Francisco, said that Brinkin has been deeply sorry for what he has done and has fully understood the damage that child pornography can inflict on victims.

Former prosecutor sentenced to 10 days for wrongful conviction

Ken Anderson, the former District Attorney of Williamson County, was meted with a 10-day jail term after the judge accepted his no-contest plea for the charge of contempt of court.

The charge steamed from the wrongful conviction of Michael Morton who was found guilty for the murder of his wife in 1986 and was sentenced to life imprisonment.

However, in 2011, Morton's conviction was overturned using DNA as proof that he did not kill his wife.

In the light of that development, Anderson, who had prosecuted Morton's case, was scrutinized and was determined to have erred when he withheld evidence which would have been beneficial for Morton's defense.

Aside from the short jail stay, Anderson will also have to give up his license as a lawyer and as part of the plea bargain, he will also be disbarred for five years.

Austin attorney Eric Nichols, however, pointed out that there will be no conviction for Anderson on any criminal charge.

Morton, for his part, said he is more than happy with the result because all he wanted was for Anderson not to practice law anymore to prevent what happened to him from happening to anyone else again.

Anderson was also fined and made to do community service.