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Minneapolis, MN Attorneys, Lawyers and Law Firms

Directory of Minneapolis, Minnesota Attorneys, Lawyers, Law Firms, etc.
(4726 attorneys currently listed)

Featured Minneapolis Attorneys

Criminal Attorneys »
MinnesotaLawyers.com
5775 Wayzata Blvd., Ste. 700
St. Louis Park, MN 55416
(612) 240-8005
Aggressive and Affordable representation!
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Employment Attorneys »
Law Office of
Joshua R. Williams, PLLC
1624 Harmon Place, Suite 300Q
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55403
(612) 486-5540
Minneapolis Employment Lawyer
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Enhanced Listings

100 South Fifth Street, Suite 1100
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55402
(612) 333-2111
Business and Corporate Lawyers
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Minneapolis, MN Attorney News

Woman faces five years in jail for lying to a grand jury

A five-year jail term looms over Saynab Hussein after she pleaded guilty to having lied before a grand jury in 2009 about young men leaving Minnesota for Somalia and joining a terrorist group.

Hussein admitted having told the grand jury that she had no idea or was not aware of anyone raising funds for the men being recruited to go to Somalia.

Hussein, now 23 and carrying a child, in fact, was one of those who had raised the funds.

Minnesota criminal defense attorney John Lundquist attributed his client's mistake to being young but that she has regretted what she has done.

Hussein is one of the long list of persons charged in connection with the government's investigation on the recruitment of young men for terrorism in Somalia.

Hussein's sentencing has yet to be scheduled.

United States Attorney News

Former FOX 5 anchor exonerated of DUI charges

A jury has exonerated Amanda Davis, a retired anchor of FOX 5, from charges of driving under the influence and reckless driving.

Instead, she was held liable for not being able to maintain driving on one lane which resulted to an accident in 2012.

For her sentence, Davis will be serving the community for 20 hours.

She will also be made to pay $200 as fine.

Defending for Davis was Atlanta DUI lawyer William "Bubba" Head.

Man cleared of rape that happened in 1993

Stephen Cothran was acquitted of rape and kidnapping charges in connection to an incident that happened in 1993.

Cothran, 56, became a suspect when his DNA linked him to evidence gathered during the incident.

However, a negative test had the jury dismissing the charges against Cothran.

Reuben Sheperd, a criminal attorney in Cleveland defending for Cothran, said that the victim had agreed to have sex with his client.

Cuyahoga corruption snitch gets six years in prison

J. Kevin Kelley was handed a six-year prison sentence for his involvement in the Cuyahoga corruption case, considered as one of the biggest in the county.

Kelley was the first defendant to offer his cooperation to the FBI who was investigating the corruption issue.

He admitted to being the one who collects and pays off the bribes to county officials.

During his sentencing, Kelley issued an apology to his family as well as the taxpayers of Cuyahoga County.

Kelley has also been ordered to pay restitution of about $700,000.

Kelley's cooperation ensured the cooperation of other defendants in the case and the conviction of several people involved in the corruption.

Cleveland defense attorney John Gibbons said there is no excuse for Kelley's involvement in the corruption, however, his cooperation is the best way for him to make amends.

NFL player's non-cooperation sees theft charges dropped against woman who stole his jewelry

Theft charges against Subhanna Beyah were dropped after her victim, New York Giants' Shaun Rogers, refused to cooperate with the authorities.

Jonathan Meltz, Beyah's lawyer in Miami, could not be contacted to comment on the issue.

Miami prosecutors believed that Beyah did to Rogers what she did to two other men, wherein she drugged them before stealing their valuables.

According to the police, Rogers had met Beyah at the nightclub of the hotel where he was staying.

Together with another couple, they had gone up to his room where he went to sleep while the others were partying. Before he went to sleep, he put his jewelry inside a safe in the room. When he woke up, Beyah was already gone and so was his jewelry worth almost $500,000.

Rogers had told the prosecution that he was not willing to cooperate during the one time he spoke with them.

Despite the failure of the theft charges to prosper, the prosecution instead will go ahead with charging Beyah for violating her probation wherein she is looking at a 20-year prison sentence if convicted.

Man avoids manslaughter conviction

Donnell Deshawn Stean was cleared of manslaughter charges for the death of Bernard Howard Jr. whom he shot during an altercation.

The jury had found that Stean had only shot Howard in defense.

Howard was found to have more than the legal limit of alcohol in his blood while Stean had tested positive of an ingredient found in marijuana.

Howard was one of the people whom Stean found in his apartment when he went home on the night of Nov. 3. They were drinking and helping out a roommate of Stean's who was moving out.

The group got upset when Stean hit an older man who was also living in the apartment.

Howard had punched Stean, who retaliated by pulling out his gun.

Sacramento defense attorney Alan Whisenand said his client, Stean, had felt threatened by the group thus his actions.

Stean was also cleared of seriously wounding the female roommate's brother during the incident.